I heard the term ‘silent epidemic’ when people refer to traumatic brain injury? What does not mean?

Silent Epidemic Brain Injury Brain Injury

I heard the term ‘silent epidemic’ when people refer to traumatic brain injury? What does not mean?

According to the Center for Disease Control, there are nearly 1.5 million cases of TBI-some mild, some severe-reported each year in this country. About 50,000 of the people who have a TBI die, and about 80,000 leave the hospital with a disability. Today, about 5.3 million people in this country live with a disability that was caused by a traumatic brain injury, which is why it is called the “silent epidemic”.
A traumatically brain injured individual may appear fine on the surface and may not exhibit obvious signs of a head injury. An individual may have a complete medical recovery from the physical symptoms and yet continue to experience some lingering (and chronic) functional problems (e.g., reasoning, problem-solving or memory capabilities) in his or her attempt to resume a normal life. It is important to remember that symptoms vary in type and severity, depending on the degree of the injury and the portion of the brain involved.

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